Design and copywriting for Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board brochure. Interior spread shown.   Primary content in dark gray band follows:   —    Salmon woke us up.   The Upper Columbia is defined as a region of abundance – big rivers, big harvests, big fish.  Different people, with very different interests, are united by an understanding of what it means to live in this unique place. When one of our most prized species was struggling to survive, we all knew it was time to act.  With sound science, no-nonsense collaboration, and a proven track record of implementing challenging recovery projects, the UCSRB brings people together. And together, we’re bringing salmon back.   —    Fish need forests. People do, too.   The vast majority of land in the Upper Columbia region is comprised of the 4-million acre Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest (OWNF), and a large portion of salmon recovery streams originate there. Conditions on the OWNF make it susceptible to uncharacteristic fires, disease and pest epidemics that cause habitat loss.   The UCSRB has convened the Forest Health Collaborative to help double National Forest restoration opportunities over the next 10 years. Because you know who needs the clean air, cool water, and stored snow pack that healthy forests provide? We all do.   —    Working together really works.   We didn’t want federal Endangered Species Act listings of our salmon; but when they came, we didn’t fight them – we took them on. We are 7 years in to the 30-year recovery plan we worked to coordinate, and the UCSRB continues to inspire the nation with the success of our local, non-regulatory approach.  And we didn’t get here alone. With sustained efforts from willing landowners, local, state, federal and tribal governments, and a host of nonprofit organizations, the UCSRB is proud to say our collective efforts are working. Salmon are returning, and communities are experiencing renewed fishing opportunities and healthier watersheds.  But progress doesn’t mean stop. It means talk, implement, monitor, adapt – and above all – stay the course. We have decades to go, and a plan to get us there.


Design and copywriting for Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board brochure. Interior spread shown.

Primary content in dark gray band follows:

Salmon woke us up.

The Upper Columbia is defined as a region of abundance – big rivers, big harvests, big fish.  Different people, with very different interests, are united by an understanding of what it means to live in this unique place. When one of our most prized species was struggling to survive, we all knew it was time to act.

With sound science, no-nonsense collaboration, and a proven track record of implementing challenging recovery projects, the UCSRB brings people together. And together, we’re bringing salmon back.

Fish need forests. People do, too.

The vast majority of land in the Upper Columbia region is comprised of the 4-million acre Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest (OWNF), and a large portion of salmon recovery streams originate there. Conditions on the OWNF make it susceptible to uncharacteristic fires, disease and pest epidemics that cause habitat loss. 

The UCSRB has convened the Forest Health Collaborative to help double National Forest restoration opportunities over the next 10 years. Because you know who needs the clean air, cool water, and stored snow pack that healthy forests provide? We all do.

Working together really works.

We didn’t want federal Endangered Species Act listings of our salmon; but when they came, we didn’t fight them – we took them on. We are 7 years in to the 30-year recovery plan we worked to coordinate, and the UCSRB continues to inspire the nation with the success of our local, non-regulatory approach.

And we didn’t get here alone. With sustained efforts from willing landowners, local, state, federal and tribal governments, and a host of nonprofit organizations, the UCSRB is proud to say our collective efforts are working. Salmon are returning, and communities are experiencing renewed fishing opportunities and healthier watersheds.

But progress doesn’t mean stop. It means talk, implement, monitor, adapt – and above all – stay the course. We have decades to go, and a plan to get us there.


   Branding, site design, content development and copywriting —  swedbergcontracting.com


Branding, site design, content development and copywriting — swedbergcontracting.com


   Direction, design and copywriting.  (Time-sensitive piece completed prior to Swedberg logo/brand development.)


Direction, design and copywriting. (Time-sensitive piece completed prior to Swedberg logo/brand development.)


   Branding, site design, content development and copywriting —  beaumontcellars.com


Branding, site design, content development and copywriting — beaumontcellars.com


   Branding, site design, content development and copywriting/editing —  redlotushealth.com


Branding, site design, content development and copywriting/editing — redlotushealth.com


   Branding, site design, content development and copywriting/editing —    bridgesproduce.com


Branding, site design, content development and copywriting/editing — bridgesproduce.com


   Short film consultation, proposal development and copywriting for ESPN + WNBA film ideas and Net Worth full-length documentary proposal. Short film was screened at Seattle International Film Festival in 2014.   Content for above document follows:  —   ESPN + WNBA / Four Documentary Film Ideas   I’m Lane Stroud, a Seattle-based documentary filmmaker. In response to ESPN’s continuing interest in high-quality film, and the recent commemoration of the 40th anniversary of Title IX, I’d like to present four documentary film ideas about the WNBA for your review and consideration.  Over a year ago, I contacted the Seattle Storm about my interest in making a film about the WNBA, and began a series of conversations with Storm CEO Karen Bryant. During the extended development and permission process, my interest and focus broadened from the history of the Storm to the current positioning of the WNBA within American sports, and the way that rising levels of play and new leadership are changing the game.  I have an active working relationship with Maya Moore and Sue Bird’s agent, Lindsay Kagawa Colas, who along with Moore and her family, I met while filming Euroleague action in Spain this winter. Kagawa Colas and Moore have both granted me access to Moore’s story and personal footage from her formative years.   I’ve also met with WNBA President Laurel Richie, who has agreed to allow me to include her story, and has offered rights to WNBA footage. I’m in good standing with USA Basketball and have footage of the 2012 Olympic team, specifically focused on Maya Moore, Sue Bird, Tamika Catchings and Coach Auriemma.   I’ve got great access, extensive preliminary footage and necessary legal representation, and strongly feel that ESPN is where these stories belong. I looking forward to discussing the possibilities in more detail, and appreciate your consideration.  —   Maya Moore - Her rise to stardom, and how her fame is changing the game.  The first female athlete to be endorsed by the elite Jordan brand, Moore possesses a rare talent and something else very few of her peers experience – fame among mainstream audiences who otherwise couldn’t care less about women’s basketball.   How will she leverage this advantage this winter by playing in China, a priority market for the Jordan/Nike brand? How does her star power affect the new president Laurel Richie’s stated goal of turning the WNBA into a world class business?  Armed with a video camera throughout her formative years, Moore has volunteered first-ever access to hundreds of hours of personal footage. Combined with extensive on-court footage, this story has classic biopic appeal: a star is born, and she’s a gamechanger.  —   Sue Bird - She shoots to win, and 10 years later, is still doing it better.  Starting point guard for the Seattle Storm and 2012 Olympic team, Bird came into the league at a time when the point guard did one thing – pass.  Yet her shooting ability and versatility inspired a new generation of point guards. How has the changing of the point guard position affected the rising levels of play, and the evolution of professional women’s basketball?  This story highlights athletic prowess, and allows sports-minded viewers to engage with women’s basketball as though legitimacy is a foregone conclusion.   —   Seattle Storm - The team that saved itself, and continues to lead the league.   In 2008, four businesswomen and season ticket holders came together to buy the Seattle Storm and save it from moving to Oklahoma with their NBA counterpart, the Sonics.  It was the unique elements of the Storm community – intense fan loyalty, CEO expertise and superstars Sue Bird and Lauren Jackson – that gave the Force 10 ownership group the confidence to step forward and buy a sports franchise on the brink of exportation. The Storm has become a model of independent ownership, and was the first women-owned sports franchise in US history to win a national championship in 2010.  This is a story of redemption and leadership – the team that not only could, but did.  —   Tamika Catchings - Tough love turned team captain. (Thanks for the lead, ESPN.)   Captain of the 2012 Olympic basketball team, Catchings sees her hearing loss not as an impairment but the reason for her success. As a young girl she was tired of being teased and threw her clunky hearing aids into a field. Her parents refused to buy her another pair.  So she sits in the front row in the classroom, asks a lot of questions, and starts playing basketball. Because she can’t rely on her hearing, she develops a near sixth sense. She is so observant on the court, she is able to see things almost before they happen. She excels in college, in the WNBA and on the Olympic Team.  This is a story of liability turned leg up, and an opportunity for viewers to engage with a flawed character whose success was not given, but earned.


Short film consultation, proposal development and copywriting for ESPN + WNBA film ideas and Net Worth full-length documentary proposal. Short film was screened at Seattle International Film Festival in 2014.

Content for above document follows:

ESPN + WNBA / Four Documentary Film Ideas

I’m Lane Stroud, a Seattle-based documentary filmmaker. In response to ESPN’s continuing interest in high-quality film, and the recent commemoration of the 40th anniversary of Title IX, I’d like to present four documentary film ideas about the WNBA for your review and consideration.

Over a year ago, I contacted the Seattle Storm about my interest in making a film about the WNBA, and began a series of conversations with Storm CEO Karen Bryant. During the extended development and permission process, my interest and focus broadened from the history of the Storm to the current positioning of the WNBA within American sports, and the way that rising levels of play and new leadership are changing the game.

I have an active working relationship with Maya Moore and Sue Bird’s agent, Lindsay Kagawa Colas, who along with Moore and her family, I met while filming Euroleague action in Spain this winter. Kagawa Colas and Moore have both granted me access to Moore’s story and personal footage from her formative years. 

I’ve also met with WNBA President Laurel Richie, who has agreed to allow me to include her story, and has offered rights to WNBA footage. I’m in good standing with USA Basketball and have footage of the 2012 Olympic team, specifically focused on Maya Moore, Sue Bird, Tamika Catchings and Coach Auriemma. 

I’ve got great access, extensive preliminary footage and necessary legal representation, and strongly feel that ESPN is where these stories belong. I looking forward to discussing the possibilities in more detail, and appreciate your consideration.

Maya Moore - Her rise to stardom, and how her fame is changing the game.
The first female athlete to be endorsed by the elite Jordan brand, Moore possesses a rare talent and something else very few of her peers experience – fame among mainstream audiences who otherwise couldn’t care less about women’s basketball. 

How will she leverage this advantage this winter by playing in China, a priority market for the Jordan/Nike brand? How does her star power affect the new president Laurel Richie’s stated goal of turning the WNBA into a world class business?

Armed with a video camera throughout her formative years, Moore has volunteered first-ever access to hundreds of hours of personal footage. Combined with extensive on-court footage, this story has classic biopic appeal: a star is born, and she’s a gamechanger.

Sue Bird - She shoots to win, and 10 years later, is still doing it better.
Starting point guard for the Seattle Storm and 2012 Olympic team, Bird came into the league at a time when the point guard did one thing – pass.

Yet her shooting ability and versatility inspired a new generation of point guards. How has the changing of the point guard position affected the rising levels of play, and the evolution of professional women’s basketball?

This story highlights athletic prowess, and allows sports-minded viewers to engage with women’s basketball as though legitimacy is a foregone conclusion. 

Seattle Storm - The team that saved itself, and continues to lead the league.

In 2008, four businesswomen and season ticket holders came together to buy the Seattle Storm and save it from moving to Oklahoma with their NBA counterpart, the Sonics.

It was the unique elements of the Storm community – intense fan loyalty, CEO expertise and superstars Sue Bird and Lauren Jackson – that gave the Force 10 ownership group the confidence to step forward and buy a sports franchise on the brink of exportation. The Storm has become a model of independent ownership, and was the first women-owned sports franchise in US history to win a national championship in 2010.

This is a story of redemption and leadership – the team that not only could, but did.

Tamika Catchings - Tough love turned team captain. (Thanks for the lead, ESPN.)

Captain of the 2012 Olympic basketball team, Catchings sees her hearing loss not as an impairment but the reason for her success. As a young girl she was tired of being teased and threw her clunky hearing aids into a field. Her parents refused to buy her another pair.

So she sits in the front row in the classroom, asks a lot of questions, and starts playing basketball. Because she can’t rely on her hearing, she develops a near sixth sense. She is so observant on the court, she is able to see things almost before they happen. She excels in college, in the WNBA and on the Olympic Team.

This is a story of liability turned leg up, and an opportunity for viewers to engage with a flawed character whose success was not given, but earned.


   Branding, design, and copywriting. Interior brochure content follows:   —   Small-Town Warmth, First-Class Instruction   Nestled in Leavenworth, in the the heart of the Cascade Mountains, Snowcreek Yoga Studio is North Central Washington’s first studio dedicated to the art and science of yoga.  We live and teach in Leavenworth because we love it here, and are proud to be a premier tourist destination. We have designed our class and workshop schedule to welcome drop-ins and visitors. Our instructors love to see new faces in our studio, and create an atmosphere of warmth, comfort and genuine hospitality.  The Snowcreek approach is simple: skilled instructors  are the foundation of a well-rounded yoga studio.   Our highly-trained teachers have studied contemporary vinyasa technique, ancient philosophical foundations, and details in alignment. Each instructor brings his or her own unique approach, expertly meeting the needs of a wide variety of abilities and interests.  At Snowcreek, yoga is a way of life – deepening connections and testing our edges. We demonstrate respect for this life-enhancing discipline through mindful practice, continued study, and a commitment to health and well-being.  We invite you to visit and experience a quiet place of calm and a return to your source. Experience the gift that is yoga, in the sanctuary that is Snowcreek.  —   Inspiration Awaits   There is something for everyone at Snowcreek, from beginner to lifelong yoga devotee.  The majority of our instructors hold 200-hour certifications, with 500-hour Yoga Alliance certification required for lead instructors. To continually inspire high-quality yoga instruction and practice, we bring leading teachers from throughout the Pacific Northwest to Leavenworth to conduct workshops and events.  We also offer advanced studies and teacher training, and have become the area’s first yoga studio to provide a 200-hour teacher certification program. 


Branding, design, and copywriting. Interior brochure content follows:

Small-Town Warmth, First-Class Instruction

Nestled in Leavenworth, in the the heart of the Cascade Mountains, Snowcreek Yoga Studio is North Central Washington’s first studio dedicated to the art and science of yoga.

We live and teach in Leavenworth because we love it here, and are proud to be a premier tourist destination. We have designed our class and workshop schedule to welcome drop-ins and visitors. Our instructors love to see new faces in our studio, and create an atmosphere of warmth, comfort and genuine hospitality.

The Snowcreek approach is simple: skilled instructors  are the foundation of a well-rounded yoga studio. 

Our highly-trained teachers have studied contemporary vinyasa technique, ancient philosophical foundations, and details in alignment. Each instructor brings his or her own unique approach, expertly meeting the needs of a wide variety of abilities and interests.

At Snowcreek, yoga is a way of life – deepening connections and testing our edges. We demonstrate respect for this life-enhancing discipline through mindful practice, continued
study, and a commitment to health and well-being.

We invite you to visit and experience a quiet place of calm and a return to your source. Experience the gift that is yoga, in the sanctuary that is Snowcreek.

Inspiration Awaits

There is something for everyone at Snowcreek, from beginner to lifelong yoga devotee.

The majority of our instructors hold 200-hour certifications, with 500-hour Yoga Alliance certification required for lead instructors. To continually inspire high-quality yoga instruction and practice, we bring leading teachers from throughout the Pacific Northwest to Leavenworth to conduct workshops and events.

We also offer advanced studies and teacher training, and have become the area’s first yoga studio to provide a 200-hour teacher certification program. 


   Direction, design and copywriting.


Direction, design and copywriting.


   Branding, brochure direction/design and copywriting. 


Branding, brochure direction/design and copywriting. 


   Direction, design, and copywriting/editing.  Right panel content follows:  —   Pay As You Throw.    Save Money. Protect Our Environment.   Curbside recycling has finally come to Leavenworth! Leavenworth Recycles would like to thank the City for making this possible. If you haven’t already, call Waste Management at 662-4591 to sign up for recycling service. For an additional $8 per month, single-family residences receive an extra large wheeled tote that accepts a mix of commonly recycled items, and there’s no sorting required. (Curbside recycling is not currently available for businesses or multi-family dwellings.) About 120 of the approximately 900 single-family residences in the City have signed up already, and that’s a great start.  But we’ve got more work to do. Leavenworth Recycles believes City garbage policy needs to be improved to provide a fair rate structure to residents, and encourage greater participation in recycling. The plan we propose is a win-win situation. You’ll have the opportunity to save money on your garbage bill, and the City can still meet projected revenues for garbage service.   It’s been proven in communities throughout the U.S. that recycling rates go up when residents are charged for garbage service based on the size of their container. In our neck of the woods, the largest containers cost about $19 per month, while the smallest run about $7 per month. This structure is called “Pay As You Throw,” and is already in place throughout most of Chelan County.  When you choose a small or medium size tote, and even add optional recycling service, the total is still less than the largest container by itself. In contrast, the City of Leavenworth currently charges you a flat rate of $22 per month for 2 medium-sized cans, whether you want or need that much room for your trash. We're paying more for our service, and have fewer options, than the majority of County residents.  The City recently ordered a new garbage truck with an automated arm that will arrive in a few months. It’s designed to work with totes of varying sizes. Unfortunately, Leavenworth Recycles has learned that the City intends to required all households to use, and pay for, the large size tote. There are two problems with this approach: it creates more waste, and costs more money.  First, extra roomy totes typically encourage people to throw more items away, including ones that could be recycled, simply out of habit. Secondly, the City pays the County about $25 per cubic yard when it empties the garbage truck at the dump, and more garbage means more costly trips. The City’s “One Size Fits All” approach means they’re missing an opportunity to save money at the dump, and are certainly missing an opportunity to encourage recycling. Even if the environmental benefits of recycling aren’t your primary concern, saving money is something that most of us can agree is a good thing.  When the savings at the dump are factored in, the City can continue to meet revenue goals for garbage service by offering a variable rate structure that charges more for larger totes, and less for smaller ones. The City plans to order about 1000 large totes to go with the new truck. If this upfront investment is made, getting the City to consider a more fair, flexible rate structure in the future is very unlikely.  Now is the time to speak up about the benefits of a "Pay as You Throw" system. Fill out, detach and mail the pre-addressed, stamped postcard today.  In addition, please email Mayor Rob Eaton at mayor@cityofleavenworth.com and let him know that when it comes to garbage, bigger is definitely not better.


Direction, design, and copywriting/editing. Right panel content follows:

Pay As You Throw.

Save Money. Protect Our Environment.

Curbside recycling has finally come to Leavenworth! Leavenworth Recycles would like to thank the City for making this possible. If you haven’t already, call Waste Management at 662-4591 to sign up for recycling service. For an additional $8 per month, single-family residences receive an extra large wheeled tote that accepts a mix of commonly recycled items, and there’s no sorting required. (Curbside recycling is not currently available for businesses or multi-family dwellings.) About 120 of the approximately 900 single-family residences in the City have signed up already, and that’s a great start.

But we’ve got more work to do. Leavenworth Recycles believes City garbage policy needs to be improved to provide a fair rate structure to residents, and encourage greater participation in recycling. The plan we propose is a win-win situation. You’ll have the opportunity to save money on your garbage bill, and the City can still meet projected revenues for garbage service. 

It’s been proven in communities throughout the U.S. that recycling rates go up when residents are charged for garbage service based on the size of their container. In our neck of the woods, the largest containers cost about $19 per month, while the smallest run about $7 per month. This structure is called “Pay As You Throw,” and is already in place throughout most of Chelan County.

When you choose a small or medium size tote, and even add optional recycling service, the total is still less than the largest container by itself. In contrast, the City of Leavenworth currently charges you a flat rate of $22 per month for 2 medium-sized cans, whether you want or need that much room for your trash. We're paying more for our service, and have fewer options, than the majority of County residents.

The City recently ordered a new garbage truck with an automated arm that will arrive in a few months. It’s designed to work with totes of varying sizes. Unfortunately, Leavenworth Recycles has learned that the City intends to required all households to use, and pay for, the large size tote. There are two problems with this approach: it creates more waste, and costs more money.

First, extra roomy totes typically encourage people to throw more items away, including ones that could be recycled, simply out of habit. Secondly, the City pays the County about $25 per cubic yard when it empties the garbage truck at the dump, and more garbage means more costly trips. The City’s “One Size Fits All” approach means they’re missing an opportunity to save money at the dump, and are certainly missing an opportunity to encourage recycling. Even if the environmental benefits of recycling aren’t your primary concern, saving money is something that most of us can agree is a good thing.

When the savings at the dump are factored in, the City can continue to meet revenue goals for garbage service by offering a variable rate structure that charges more for larger totes, and less for smaller ones. The City plans to order about 1000 large totes to go with the new truck. If this upfront investment is made, getting the City to consider a more fair, flexible rate structure in the future is very unlikely.

Now is the time to speak up about the benefits of a "Pay as You Throw" system. Fill out, detach and mail the pre-addressed, stamped postcard today.

In addition, please email Mayor Rob Eaton at mayor@cityofleavenworth.com and let him know that when it comes to garbage, bigger is definitely not better.